, Is Affiliate Marketing Dead?   (2019 Edition)

Is Affiliate Marketing Dead? (2019 Edition)

Sharing is caring!

Yesterday’s WTAFF newsletter was VERY interesting. What caught my attention was Neil Patel saying Affiliate Marketing is dead?!

If you ask this question, mods on forums and proud people will scream “NO ITS MORE ALIVE THAN EVER BEFORE!!!”

I find this statement a bit of a mystery. Were these people not around in the affiliate marketing world 5-10 years ago? Or is their ego so high that they can’t admit to themselves the fact that things evolved and matured; gone are the days of launching just about anything and printing money?

Things evolved in the policy department, approval teams both AI and manual are onto affliate style ads faster than ever before. These two things are the direct reason why ‘affiliate marketing is dying’


No Mr. Grylls. Only Your Show Is.

What old G’s like Neil Patel, Ian Fernando, and many other veteran affiliates mean when they say aff marketing is dead, is that it’s changed so much you can’t just throw shit up and print fuck you money.

Rip N Run doesn’t work as good as it used to, even tho this was the weapon of choice for the mememe affiliates that never share anything with anyone fearing that they’ll make less.

The easy way of affiliate marketing is dying indeed; but affiliate marketing itself won’t die because it can be very good if work is invested into more than simply turning $1 to $2 as fast, and with as little effort as possible.

ANGLES are going to be the way to dominate verticals; if you will have the creative force you will be a top aff.

Longer funnels, and user retention, having people return will be the trick to play with to increase profits. Sure, we will have to work HARDER for the crazy ROI’s that were had in the past (when affiliate marketing was ‘alive’) but the industry itself is not going to die… its just maturing… Snapchatads anyone? 😀

Sharing is caring!

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

shares